Green/Sustainable Meetings

  • Sustainable event planning

    Sustainability is a powerful conversation within major corporations and the corporate meetings marketplace. According to the 2011 Carbon Disclosure Project Canadian report, the top 200 largest Canadian companies report that the three main drivers for increased transparency related to sustainability impact monitoring are: 1) new revenue streams, 2) an increase in brand value, and 3) reducing cost and mitigating the risk of rising oil prices. The CDP Canadian report notes: “In short, the majority of companies see a clear economic benefit in implementing efficiency initiatives that replace emissions-intensive technologies and processes with cleaner and cheaper alternatives.”

  • Why communication is key to sustainable meeting success

    One of the first tips I share with event professionals who are beginning to plan sustainable meetings and events is to remember to tell everyone what they are trying to accomplish (i.e. strategies they are using to minimize the environmental footprint). And then I tell them to ensure that afterwards, they express to everyone involved how well they did (i.e. how much waste was diverted, energy saved, etc.).

  • The business case for sustainability at your events

    The research tracked 184 companies between 2003 and 2010 and identified seven key benefits that companies reported experiencing as a result of their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives. It was immediately apparent to me how this research could make an excellent basis for any meeting planner looking to promote change within their organization by incorporating sustainability and CSR to their events.

  • Green party tricks

    Some planners use pyrotechnics, others hire magicians, but green event specialists try to make the ordinary, extraordinary. The challenge for a green meeting planner is to rethink and reimagine, and by doing so, they often come up with some green “party tricks”.

  • GBTA Foundation re-launches Project ICARUS to create the travel industry’s first global sustainability program

    The GBTA Foundation, the education and research foundation of the Global Business Travel Association (GBTA) today announced the expansion of Project ICARUS, the first global travel management sustainability body, representing the interests of the global travel and meetings industry. Project ICARUS will include recognition and awards programs highlighting leading organizations in sustainability and a Global Advisory board with representatives from buyers, suppliers, academics and subject matter experts from Europe, North America, Asia, Australia/New Zealand and Latin America to provide expertise, leadership and guidance on sustainability.

  • The golden moment: when social responsibility becomes profitable

    Lately we have seen an influx of stories in the media about very large corporations taking large steps towards becoming better corporate citizens. Whether it’s through green initiatives, buying local food, or demanding meat from more humane sources, large companies are hearing what used to be small blips on the radar, and shouting it from the rooftops. People want better, are demanding better, and companies are listening. Of course, doing the “right thing” must also be the right thing for the business. There is that golden moment when social responsibility becomes profitable, and that’s when real change can happen. So, what’s wrong with that?

  • MPI creating breakthrough sustainability leadership with association industry’s first Global Reporting Initiative™ event report

    Meeting Professionals International (MPI) and its Foundation is committed to thought leadership in corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability efforts. In demonstration of that, MPI is setting the example for standards-based reporting that everyone in the industry – no matter how large or small the event – can use to benchmark their own reporting programs.

  • How much goat cheese did you say you needed? Serving up the best local food for 2000 people

    If you read the newspaper, listen to the news, eat in restaurants, or peruse the cookbooks in your bookstore, you may have noticed a bit of a local food revolution going on. Maybe it’s less of a revolution and more of a revival, because eating locally by purchasing food from farmers nearby, and respecting the rhythms of the seasons is how we used to eat. More than a trend, it’s a widespread realization that we have moved away from a natural, logical way of feeding ourselves that works. My prediction? The local food “movement” won’t be moving anytime soon.

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